The gap: who we say we are vs. who we actually are

To a certain extent, we all have an idealized version of ourselves. It could be something as small as: Who we say we are: “I’m really ambitious! I’m spending 10 extra hours per week teaching myself a new programming language” Who we actually are: (falls asleep with laptop on chest, streaming Netflix) To something as big as: Who we say we are: “I’m an open … Continue reading The gap: who we say we are vs. who we actually are

Why should I apologize for wanting freedom and flexibility?

It has been estimated that 50% of the U.S. workforce will be remote by 2020.   50%. By 2020. Whether or not this prediction comes to fruition, it’s undeniable that the way we view work — its role in our lives, the employer-employee relationship, how we want to work, when we want to work and where we want to work — has changed significantly in the … Continue reading Why should I apologize for wanting freedom and flexibility?

You need to give to get what you want

“You need to give to get what you want.” Let’s highlight the keywords in that phrase: give and get. The concept seems intuitive, doesn’t it? Perhaps even simple. In practice, however, giving something in order to get something can be difficult to do and very few people I know have mastered this critical life skill, critical in that it has the ability to transform every … Continue reading You need to give to get what you want

Why are we obsessed with labelling?

From ethnic identity to sexual preference, political leaning, dietary needs and everything in between, humans are highly skilled at creating and using labels as cognitive shortcuts in an attempt to understand one another. On the surface, it may seem relatively harmless to categorize people via the use of labels, right? On one hand, it could be argued that labelling is a helpful social filtering tool … Continue reading Why are we obsessed with labelling?

The case for randomizing our lives

There’s something to be said for routine. Take a generalized work week as an example. For many, it’s the classic: wake up, get ready for work, go to work, work, come home from work, (insert post work activity of choice – hit the gym, family dinner, socialize with friends, etc.) go to bed and repeat. For the most part, it’s predictable. It’s comfortable. It’s efficient … Continue reading The case for randomizing our lives

What’s wrong with the early retirement dream

Early retirement. On the surface, it’s sold as a shiny gateway to unadulterated freedom, leisure and fulfillment. What’s not to love? “I want to travel the world”, “I’ll never set my alarm again” or “I’ll spend my days posted up at the beach, margarita in hand” are common musings I hear when this topic comes up in conversation. There’s nothing inherently wrong with the early … Continue reading What’s wrong with the early retirement dream

Give up saying always and never

Years ago, I listened to Daniel Gilbert, a psychology researcher at Harvard University, share his findings from a survey study of over 19,000 people which looked at the change in one’s personality and values over time. Some survey participants were asked to look back on how they had changed over the past 10 years. Others were asked to predict how they thought they would change in … Continue reading Give up saying always and never